Category Archives: Greenpeace

A shortage of options

Columnizing for CBC.ca, Simon Jackson pumps up the idea that a growing bloc of young voters is keen on something like my own brand of environmentalist conservatism: seeing sound long-term economic policy and sound long-term environmental policy as pretty much the same thing, and wishing desperately there were somebody to vote for who seems to really get that.

Jackson surveys the bleak electoral landscape:

All of the current parties have elements within their platforms that should be attractive to Young Green Tories.

Jack Layton’s NDP has placed an emphasis on “green-collared jobs;” Stéphane Dion’s Liberals have the Green Shift that marries a tax on pollution with massive income tax cuts; and the Stephen Harper’s Conservatives have a strong emphasis in investing in green technology, such as capturing carbon, that would benefit both the environment and the economy.

Yet each party also appears to have a fatal flaw when it comes to attracting Young Green Tories: the NDP is still viewed as the party of old-school socialism; the Liberals are perceived to be suffering from a leftward retreat and sponsorship-scandal hangover; and the Conservatives are feared to be insincere in their support for the environment.

The Green party appears to have the best hope of rallying Young Green Tories — at least with their talk on the campaign trail of “catering neither to the left nor right but rather to those who believe in sound fiscal management and strengthening our economy while ensuring that it is sustainable.”

Indeed, this purposeful approach of the Greens — reading correctly the mood of many of today’s young activists — may be what is contributing to their surge in popular support in recent polls.

That said, as Andrew Steele of the Globe and Mail noted recently in his online column, when the Green platform is assessed closely, the party still has fringe elements of the old-school activist community that may ultimately be the stumbling block to an electoral breakthrough.

Two thoughts. First, the notion that “the Conservatives are feared to be insincere in their support for the environment” is the best wry understatement I’ve read all months.

Second, I’m not sure the Greens are really surging. They’re doing OK in the CBC’s Harris-Decima poll, 12 per cent, though probably not well enough to win any seats. Nanos has them at six. The Strategic Counsel’s battleground-riding polls (PDF) show a bit of a surge, and then a subsiding. Neither here nor there, though, since I think the underlying point about the Greens’ crunchy history showing through a bit too much is accurate.

With the election campaign reaching the midpoint, it looks to me as through the Liberals are probably the best environmental vote, but they leave so much else to be desired that it’d be a nose-holder for sure.

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Conspicuous destruction

Greenpeace steamrollers 10,000 old-style incandescent lightbulbs on a square in Berlin. Because they’re wasteful. The bulbs are, is the idea, I think.

I don’t share Andrew Potter’s idea that this will go down as the moment the anti-global-warming movement jumped the shark, but it may go down as the moment Greenpeace, which jumped the shark ages ago, went finally and irretrievably nuts.